Topiknyitó: lehoka 2007. 03. 07. 16:00

TIPPSAROK  

Rendezés:
Hozzászólások oldalanként:
alex67 2006. 04. 19. 09:28
Előzmény: #64479  alex67
#64480
Bocs már kivették. Feljebb én is beálltam shortozni a buxot.
alex67 2006. 04. 19. 09:27
Előzmény: #64478  Greenspam
#64479
Szemesi
Te álltál be azzal sok bux shorttal? Így nem tudok feljebb eladni.
Greenspam 2006. 04. 19. 09:23
Előzmény: #64477  alex67
#64478
boci...hihihi...aki 2299-en vett az most nem örül...szomjas az na...hagyjuk inni nyugodtan...
alex67 2006. 04. 19. 09:22
Előzmény: #64476  szemesi
#64477
Úgy érzem ideje elkezdeni a short pozikat felvenni.
szemesi 2006. 04. 19. 09:14
Előzmény: #64475  Greenspam
#64476
Igazad van, szerintem ez a hurrá optimizmus hamar alábbhagy....
Greenspam 2006. 04. 19. 09:13
Előzmény: #64474  szemesi
#64475
miért nem teccik? kaszáid elrohadtak...? én épp most vásároltam újakat és már élezem....lesz itt még rán miatt para idén....Izrael a 3. VH-val fenyeget...etc.
szemesi 2006. 04. 19. 09:09
#64474
Brutál kezdés. De ennek ellenére nem értem ezt az egészet. Ha Amerika emelkedik, akkor mi is, de ha Amerika esik akkor mi nem... hogy van ez???:)))
Greenspam 2006. 04. 19. 08:48
Előzmény: #64471  Greenspam
#64473
11:45 *YELLEN SAYS SHE'S WATCHING FOR DATA THAT DEVIATE FROM FORECAST
11:45 *YELLEN'S COMMENTS FROM TEXT OF SPEECH AT SAN JOSE CONFERENCE
11:45 *YELLEN `WOULD BE SURPRISED' TO SEE LABOR MKT BOOST INFLATION
11:45 *FED'S YELLEN SAYS FED FUNDS RATE `CLOSE TO A NEUTRAL STANCE'
11:45 *YELLEN SEES TEMPORARY INFLATION EFFECT FROM HIGH COMMODITIES
11:45 *YELLEN SAYS INFLATION CONTAINED, RISK `SLIGHTLY TO THE UPSIDE'
11:45 *FED'S YELLEN SAYS ECONOMY OPERATING CLOSE TO `FULL EMPLOYMENT'
11:45 *YELLEN SAYS DOUBLING OF ENERGY PRICES HAS YET TO SLOW SPENDING
11:45 *YELLEN SAYS SLOWER HOME APPRECIATION TO COOL CONSUMER SPENDING
11:45 *YELLEN SAYS U.S. ECONOMY WILL SLOW AFTER `VERY RAPID' 1ST QTR
11:45 *FED'S YELLEN `INCREASINGLY CONCERNED' ABOUT POLICY LAG EFFECT
11:45 *FED'S YELLEN `HIGHLY ALERT' TO POLICY POSSIBLY `GOING TOO FAR'
bumbi 2006. 04. 19. 08:46
Előzmény: #64467  kaygee
#64472
jó sokat írtatok, sikereim nem veszik el az eszemeet ,mert nincsenek :D pár ezer ft-s pluszban vagyok, buktam is nyertem is, de nem sokat, gyakorlásra szántam, a kezdeti időszakot.

tőkeáttétel nekem olyannyira ellenszenves, hogy nem mondok szivesen előre semmit ,de legszivesebben akkor sem hasznbálnám hogyha, majd jobban vbelejövök, a hati-ról meg azt sem tudom micsoda, szóval az tényleg oroszrulett lenne :)) (ja teli tárral természetesen:))
Greenspam 2006. 04. 19. 08:43
Előzmény: #64470  Krumenaker
#64471
Japan's giant sucking sound
By Jephraim P Gundzik

On March 9, the central Bank of Japan (BOJ) signaled that the era of free
money, known as "quantitative easing", would soon begin to wind down. This
change has spurred broad international commentary focused mainly on the timing
of Japan's return to normal interest-rate-directed monetary policy and the
broad implications of this return for both Japan's economy and the global
economy.

Much more significant, the end of quantitative easing will pull an enormous
amount of liquidity from Asian and US stocks and bonds, prompting widespread
asset price depreciation and yen revaluation.

The era of quantitative easing

The BOJ first implemented quantitative easing in March 2001. At that time,
nominal official interest rates had in effect reached 0%. This left the BOJ no
scope to reduce official interest rates further to thwart the spread of
deflation and a building liquidity crisis in Japan's financial system.

Because interest rates had become zero-bound, the BOJ began to pump liquidity
into the economy and banking system by selling yen in the foreign-exchange
market, by buying Japanese government securities and, most interesting, by
funneling cash directly to Japan's commercial banks via their reserve accounts
at the central bank.

Quantitative easing initially had no discernable impact on Japan's economy.
Deflation became increasingly acute, the economy remained very weak and the
accumulation of bad loans by Japan's banks accelerated. After the spectacular
failures of several corporations and financial institutions, the BOJ ramped up
its quantitative-easing program in 2003 under the guidance of a new governor,
Toshihiko Fukui.

Fukui greatly increased the BOJ's intervention in the foreign-exchange and
government-securities markets (yen sales and purchases of Japanese government
bonds). He used much of the excess liquidity generated by this intervention to
funnel more money into the reserve accounts of Japan's commercial banks. By the
end of 2003, balances in these accounts increased from about 6 trillion yen
(US$51 billion) to more than 30 trillion yen ($256 billion), where they stayed
until late 2005.

The intention behind flooding Japan's commercial banks with liquidity was
twofold: to avert a systemic financial-system crisis, and to encourage banks to
start lending money to Japanese corporations. The flood of liquidity greatly
improved balance sheets across Japan's financial system. This was important
because the size of problem loans in the financial system had become enormous,
prompting foreign banks to shun Japanese banks because of very high
counterparty risk (risk of bank failure). Unfortunately, this liquidity had no
impact on bank lending, and domestic credit in Japan continued to contract.

The $300 billion question: Where did the liquidity go?

The cash available to Japan's financial institutions, via their reserve
accounts with the BOJ, was not limited to just the nominal increase in
liquidity in these accounts from 50 trillion yen to more than 300 trillion yen.
Rather, this excess liquidity was made continuously available to the financial
system, like an inexhaustible fountain, for nearly three years.

Though this open monetary tap provided more than enough liquidity to increase
the supply of domestic credit, demand for domestic credit remained very weak.
Total credit in Japan contracted, in nominal terms, by 4% in 2003 and 3% in
2004. Domestic credit stopped contracting in 2005, when total credit growth was
flat, before finally beginning to grow in February and March of this year - the
first such growth since 1998.

The flood of cash into Japan's financial system didn't go anywhere in 2003 and
2004. Financial institutions used this cash to bolster their own balance sheets
- a process that greatly improved the creditworthiness of Japan's banks. This
sharply reduced counterparty risk for foreign banks, which began earnestly to
tap into Japan's never-ending supply of liquidity. Using a Japanese bank as a
counterparty, foreign banks borrowed huge amounts of yen at very low interest
rates in 2005. This yen was swapped for foreign currencies and invested in
other Asian countries as well as in the United States.

Quantifying the amount of yen that global investors borrowed from Japanese
banks and subsequently invested in other countries during 2005 is extremely
difficult. Such swaps are generally conducted off-balance-sheet, meaning they
are neither directly monitored nor controlled by the BOJ. However,
exchange-rate movements between the yen and other currencies during 2005 offer
some insight into the magnitude of these swaps.

In 2005, the yen depreciated by 16% against the South Korean won, 13% against
the Malaysian ringgit, 11% against the Indian rupee, 10% against the Indonesian
rupiah, 9% against the Thai baht and 20% against the US dollar. This broad
depreciation of the yen was not driven by trade flows - Japan had a
current-account surplus of 18 trillion yen in 2005. Nor was it driven by the
net outflow of domestic investment into other countries.

According to official statistics, Japanese investors bought about 17 trillion
yen ($145 billion) worth of foreign securities in 2005. This was partially
offset by foreign investors who bought about 10 trillion yen ($85 billion) of
Japanese securities last year. This inflow of foreign investment helped push
Japanese equities up by 25% in 2005. The net outflow of investment from Japan
was only 7 trillion yen ($60 billion). Subtracting this from the 18 trillion
yen current-account surplus leaves a combined trade and investment surplus in
Japan of 11 trillion yen ($94 billion) in 2005. Under normal circumstances,
this surplus should have produced yen appreciation.

When the music stops

Because the BOJ has not intervened in the foreign-exchange markets since the
first quarter of 2004, off-balance-sheet Japanese swaps offer the only
explanation for the depreciation of the yen last year. These swaps must have
exceeded Japan's combined trade and investment surplus of 11 trillion yen by at
least 15 trillion yen, possibly 25 trillion. In other words, foreign entities
borrowed between 25 trillion and 35 trillion yen ($214 billion to $300 billion)
from Japan's banks in 2005 to invest in other countries.

Much of this money probably found its way into equity markets across Asia.
Likely candidates are South Korea, India, the Philippines and Singapore, where
the stock markets jumped 59%, 36%, 25% and 17% higher, respectively, last year
despite generally deteriorating political and economic fundamentals. Excess
Japanese liquidity probably also found its way into Turkish and Brazilian
equities and fixed-income securities, which also performed spectacularly in
2005 despite broadly deteriorating investment fundamentals.

Another likely place where excess Japanese liquidity roosted in 2005 is the US
bond market. US bond yields remained remarkably low in the face of rapidly
rising short-term interest rates last year. This performance has defied
explanation by policymakers at the US Federal Reserve, including both former
chairman Alan Greenspan and current chairman Ben Bernanke. The fountain of
liquidity that supported stellar stock- and bond-market performances in many
countries in 2005 will soon be shut off.

In announcing the policy change to end quantitative easing on March 9, BOJ
governor Fukui emphasized that outright purchases of Japanese government
securities by the central bank would continue and that official short-term
interest rates would not change much this year. According to Fukui, this would
ensure that Japan's economic recovery gathers pace during the year.

Fukui also mentioned that the BOJ had already begun to reduce the banking
system's excess reserves and that these reserves would decline from 30 trillion
yen to about 6 trillion yen by the end of June. Because these reserves were
never used to fund credit growth in Japan, their reduction will have little
impact on the Japanese economy. However, the heavy use of these reserves to
fund investments in other countries implies that their rapid reduction will
have significant negative consequences for asset markets worldwide.

As Japan's excess liquidity is mopped up, investors that borrowed Japanese yen
to fund investments in other countries will find it impossible to renew their
swaps. Because international currency and interest-rate swap liquidity is very
concentrated in tenors of one year or less (the life of a swap is called its
tenor), the majority of these swaps will mature this year. Consequently,
investors will be forced to sell the equity and fixed-income assets that these
swaps financed. In addition, these investors will have to buy yen to repay
their yen loans.

The end of quantitative easing is another factor that will propel a sharp
correction in global investment asset values this year. It will also produce
substantial yen appreciation against most currencies.
Krumenaker 2006. 04. 19. 08:33
#64470
yabbagabb 2006. 04. 19. 08:30
Előzmény: #64468  ARP
#64469

csődbement az OTP! Romániában mind a 27 fiókját elvitte az árvíz!
csak vicceltem :0))))))))))))))
ARP 2006. 04. 18. 21:49
Előzmény: #64460  ARP
#64468
Ez sem tűnik rossznak vételre:

GBP/USD
EUR/GPB
EUR/USD (hold it nice)
kaygee 2006. 04. 18. 21:02
Előzmény: #64466  Törölt felhasználó
#64467

Bumbi, én már egy ideje a határidős Bux-szal foglalkozok. Eltartott egy jó darabig, mire megismertem ezt a piacot.
Kezdetben, mikor elkezdtem, nem voltak "csak" befektetési jegyeim. Tőzsdére csak utána léptem, és kezdetben csak a promptra anélkül a cél nélkül, hogy határidőzni akartam volna. Utána léptem egyet a létrán, és végül ezzel foglalkozom már. És hangsúlyozom, kezdetben nem akartam. Rájöttem, hogy nekem ez a megfelelő.
Végigjárni a szamárlétrát sosem szégyen. Mind megtettük így vagy úgy.
Ezért írtam neked, amit írtam, hogy szerintem kizárt dolog, hogy most meg tudnád mondani, hogy mivel érdemes foglalkoznod. Később bizonyosan alakul majd. Érdemes kezdőként a prompttal foglalkozni, és semmi tőkeáttétel.
És ami a legfontosabb, nagyon vigyázz a kezdeti sikerekkel. Hamis önbizalmat adhat. Gyakran fontosabb, hogy a sikert hogyan értékeled, mint hogy mithez kezdesz miután bukta van.
Törölt felhasználó 2006. 04. 18. 20:22
Előzmény: #64465  Macs-karom
#64466
Bumbi, ott keveri össze mindenki a kaszinó és a spekiség fogalmát, hogy nem az a különbség közötte, hogy az egyikkel csak bukni lehet. Kaszinóban is lehet nyerni, csak az szerencse kérdése. Hosszútávon (nagy számok törvénye) meg kihullik a szerencse, azaz a véletlen belőle. Ha tehát érzésből humizól meg ecozól és ezt naponta teszed ahogy akartad, akkor bizony hosszútávon lehet hogy kb. 0-ban leszel, lennél, de a jutalékok miatt szépen odaadod a pénzed a brokiknak. Ráadásul a tőzsde egy nagyon geci találmány, mert érzésre sokszor pont rosszul döntenél. Ebből a szempontból a kaszinó tisztább, vagy piros lesz vagy fekete, semmi nem ösztönöz a fekete vagy a piros melletti döntésre. A tőzsdén viszont nagyonis ösztönözve vagy és legtöbbször pont a rosszabb irányra (pánikban adnál, eufóriában vennél). Szerintem a legeslegfontosabb az, hogy ne legyen kereskedési kényszered, ne akarj mindig "játszani". (csak amikor valami jó lehetőségnek tűnik - aztán ez majd kialakul, mi lesz számodra a jó lehetőség)
Macs-karom 2006. 04. 18. 20:01
Előzmény: #64461  bumbi
#64465
Bumbi,

a tőzsde valóban nem "élet- és vagyonbiztosító", de nem is feltétlenül a kaszinó szinonímája.
kaygee 2006. 04. 18. 19:54
Előzmény: #64463  bumbi
#64464

Jó, én nem rossz szándékbó írom, de jobb nem az eco TDT-vel kezdeni. Sőt azzal meg folytatni sem. aki meg gyakorltt, az végképp kerüli.
bumbi 2006. 04. 18. 19:50
Előzmény: #64462  kaygee
#64463
talán nem vagyok még elég komoyl ehhez a komoly pénzügyekhez, ha meg kell fizetni az árát akkor meg fogom, persze igyekszem jó oldalról közelíteni.
kaygee 2006. 04. 18. 19:46
Előzmény: #64461  bumbi
#64462

Bumbi azt hiszem, ezzel a hozzáállással sokba fog kerülni neked még a tapasztalatszerzés. Mint mindannyiunknak... De jobb nem a rossz irányból nekifogni rögtön az elején.
bumbi 2006. 04. 18. 19:23
Előzmény: #64459  bumbi
#64461
nem a tnaulási folyamat ellen vagyok, csak mint ahogy a kistopolódás utáni anyázás, az elemzések végére odabigyeszetett persze semmi sem biztos ez a tőzsde is arra ösztönöz, hogy mérlegelni kell, és kérdésekeet feltenni magamnak :))
Megéri -e grafikonok felett görnyedni éjszakákat , mikor pár vörös csuhás mókus 1 katitntással átvághatja a véres verejtékkel készített elemzésemet?
Megéri -e hosszú távú stratégiákat kidolgozni, úgymond tényleg évi 2 NAGYON NAGYON JÓL előkészített tradet csinálni, vagy jobb sodródni az árral, és naponta kihasználni ümike vagy ecoca napi ingadozását (persze kockázat), de ha ugyanzet elmondhatjuk fél éves előkészítés után is, mer ez ugye nem az élet és vagyonbiztosító, akkor valóban, megéri?